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Ruling out the Asian Longhorned Beetle

The Asian longhorned beetle attacks several different types of trees. For those of you who are concerned about this pest and who are just starting to examine your local trees, it can be overwhelming to think that every hole, pit and pile of sawdust you find could be ALB. Here are some tips that will help you rule out ALB as the cause of tree damage:

  • ALB attacks only hardwood trees (maple, birch, willow, etc.). Pines, fir, cedar, juniper and other conifers are “softwood” trees and are not susceptible to ALB. Other trees that are not susceptible to ALB: alder, dogwood, hickory, walnut.
  • ALB is not considered a pest of oak trees. Records indicate an oak tree in New York was found with ALB damage, but the tree was located next to many heavily infested trees that were known hosts for ALB.
  • There are many beetles and other insects that damage trees by boring holes in the wood or damaging the bark. It takes an experienced eye to detect the difference between damage caused by ALB and other insects. To learn more, view our ALB fact sheet, visit our Worcester photo gallery, or download this excellent training guide from the Canadian Forest Service.

Every infestation of ALB allows researchers to learn more about the preferences of this pest. The list of potential host species is regularly updated by the USDA, and the latest version can be downloaded here.

4 Responses | Add your Own

  • 1 JaneM yazmış:

    Is there a more comprehensive list of trees that are not susceptible to ALB that could be used as a guide for planning and re-planting?

  • 2 Jennifer Forman Orth yazmış:

    Those interested in planting species that are not susceptible to ALB may wish to consult this recommended tree planting list that the USDA produced in conjunction with their eradication program in New Jersey. While these are all ALB-free species, they may not be suitable for planting in every area. It is best to consult your local nursery, landscaper, or tree care specialist for advice before planting.

    We do not yet have a list that is specific to Massachusetts – the ALB Cooperative Eradication Program will be working with people in affected areas to determine the best species to replace the trees that have been removed.

  • 3 JOHN FRUCI yazmış:

    I HAVE A LARGE OAK TREE THAT IS DROPPING A LOT OF CLUMPS OF LEAFS/ BRANCHES ( ABOUT A FOOT LONG AND ABOUT 15 TO 35 LEAF ) ON IT IT DROPS ABOUT 6 TO 20 BRANCHES PER DAY I JUST MOVED HERE FROM FLORIDA IS THIS A PROBLEM WITH A INSECT OR SOMETHING ELCE

  • 4 jformanorth yazmış:

    There are many reasons that oak trees lose branches. We recommend you consult with a certified arborist about your tree. You might also want to check into whether you are seeing damage caused by oak twig pruners, a native species whose branch damage can be easily controlled by removing and destroying all fallen limbs before next spring. Click here for more info about the oak twig pruner.